Search engine site ABC Engine

USA History articles page

USA History page desription

On this page you see USA History page description, Site pages hyperlinks, USA History articles, Add site to search engine offer.

Site pages hyperlinks

Internet search page Blog page Make search query page Subscribe page About money in USA page Religion in USA page USA Transport page USA History articles page Ecomerce page Donate page Support page Contact us page

USA History article

USA History articles list hyperlink

Providence, Rhode Island

HistoryEdit Main article: History of Providence See also: Timeline of Providence, Rhode Island First Baptist Church in America, founded 1638, present building occupied in 1776, is the oldest Baptist congregation in America SettlementEdit The area that is now Providence was first settled in June 1636 by Roger Williams, and was one of the original Thirteen Colonies of the United States. Williams and his company felt compelled to withdraw from Massachusetts Bay Colony. They were greeted by the Narragansetts on rocks near present-day Gano Street with the greeting, "What Cheer, Netop." They sought refuge with the Narragansett tribe at a place on the banks of a salt cove, as the chief of the Narragansett, Canonicus, made them welcome.[8] In 1636, Canonicus gave Williams the large tract of land which became the first nucleus of the colony of Providence Plantation. Williams' Providence soon became a refuge for persecuted religious dissenters, as he himself had been exiled from Massachusetts.[9]Providence's growth would be slow during the next quarter-century—the subsuming of its territory into surrounding towns, difficulty of farming the land, and differing of local traditions and land conflicts all slowed development.[9] Providence in the mid-nineteenth century RevolutionEdit In the mid-1770s, the British government levied taxes that impeded Providence's maritime, fishing and agricultural industries, the mainstay of the city's economy. One example was the Sugar Act, which was a tax levied against Providence's distilleries that adversely affected its trade in rum and slaves. These taxes caused Providence to join the other colonies in renouncing allegiance to the British Crown. In response to enforcement of unpopular trade laws, Providence residents spilled blood in the leadup to the American Revolution in the notorious Gaspée Affair of 1772.[9] Though during the American Revolutionary War the city escaped British occupation, the capture of nearby Newport disrupted industry and kept the population on alert. Troops were quartered for various campaigns and Brown University's University Hall was used as a barracks and military hospital.[9] French troops were quartered in the city's Market House.[10] After departing from Newport, French troops sent by King Louis XVI and commanded by the Comte de Rochambeau passed through Providence on their way to join the attack against British forces. The march from Newport to Providence was the beginning of a campaign led jointly by Rochambeau and General George Washington in a decisive marchthat ended with the defeat of General Cornwallis in the Siege of Yorktown at Yorktown, Virginia, and the Battle of the Chesapeake. Market Square was the center of civic life in the 19th Century, and Market House was home to the city council before City Hall was built.[10] Incorporation as a cityEdit Following the war, Providence was the country's ninth-largest city[a][9] with 7,614 people. The economy shifted from maritime endeavors to manufacturing, in particular machinery, tools, silverware, jewelry, and textiles. By the start of the 20th century, Providence boasted some of the largest manufacturing plants in the country, including Brown & Sharpe, Nicholson File, and Gorham Silverware. The city's industries attracted many immigrantsfrom Ireland, Germany, Sweden, England, Italy, Portugal, Cape Verde, and French Canada. Economic and demographic shifts caused social strife, notably with a series of race riots between whites and blacks during the 1820s. City Hall was built in 1878 In response to these troubles and the economic growth, Providence residents ratified a city charter in 1831 as the population passed 17,000.[9] City GovernmentEdit From its incorporation as a city in 1832 until 1878, the seat of city government was located in the Market House,[11] located in Market Square, which was the geographic and social center of the city. The city offices quickly outgrew this building, and in 1845 the City Council resolved to create a permanent municipal building.[11] The city spent the next 30 years searching for a suitable location, resulting in what some historians have referred to as "Providence's Thirty Years War," as the council bickered over where to site the new building.[11] Finally, in 1878 the city offices moved into the newly completed City Hall. Civil WarEdit During the Civil War, local politics split over slavery as many had ties to Southern cotton. Despite ambivalence concerning the war, the number of military volunteers routinely exceeded quota, and the city's manufacturing proved invaluable to the Union. Postwar,horsecar lines covering the city enabled its growth and Providence thrived with waves of immigrants and land annexations bringing the population from 54,595 in 1865 to 175,597 by 1900.[9] From the 1890s until around 1951, a Chinatown existed around the Burrill Street and Empire Street neighborhoods, which were razed under controversy for a highway extension. Growth and declineEdit The city's boom began to wane in the mid-1920s as industries, notably textiles, shut down. Jewelry manufacturing continued to grow, taking up the slack and employing many of the city's new immigrants, coming from Portuguese, Italian, Polish, Lithuanian, and Jewish backgrounds. A number of hospitals also opened. The Great Depression hit the city hard, and Providence's downtown was subsequently flooded by the New England Hurricane of 1938. Though the city received a boost from World War II, this ended with the war. The city saw further decline as a result of nationwide trends, with the construction of highways and increased suburbanization.[9] The population would drop by 38% over the next three decades. From the 1950s to the 1980s, Providence was a notorious bastion of organized crime.[12] The mafia boss Raymond L.S. Patriarca ruled a vast criminal enterprise. RenaissanceEdit People gathering in Waterplace Park, opened in 1994, just before a WaterFire event. On the left can be seen the Waterplacecondominiums, constructed 2008. The entire area had been covered in railroad tracks and the river covered with paved bridges until the late 1980s. The city's "Renaissance" began in the 1970s. From 1975 until 1982, $606 million of local and national Community Development funds were invested throughout the city, and the hitherto falling population began to stabilize. In the 1990s, Mayor Vincent "Buddy" Cianci, Jr showcased the city's strength in arts and pushed for further revitalization, ultimately resulting in the uncovering of the city's natural rivers (which had been covered by paved bridges), relocation of a large section of railroad underground, creation of Waterplace Parkand river walks along the river's banks, and construction of the Fleet Skating Rink (now the Bank of America Skating Rink) downtown and the 1.4 million ft² Providence Place Mall.[9] New investment triggered within the city, with new construction including numerous condo projects, hotels, and a new office high-rise all filling in the freed space.[13][14] Despite new investment, poverty remains an entrenched problem as it does in most post-industrial New England cities. Approximately 27.9 percent of the city population is living below the poverty line.[15] Recent increases in real estate values further exacerbate problems for those at marginal income levels, as Providence had the highest rise in median housing price of any city in the United States from 2004 to 2005.[16]

Add site to search engine offer

To add your site to Search engine site ABC Engine click here to go to Add site to Search engine site ABC Engine offer page. This offer used for commercial grow of this site in USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, United Kingdom and Asia.

© abcengine.orgfree.com